Posts Tagged ‘site tour’

Site Tour Sunday

Posted on Feb 13, 2011

Every other Sunday our entire team tours the site, this includes the archaeoscience people working in the Laboratory and the Villa staff (the GIS, archive and photographic teams). The excavator of each unit gives a brief overview of what he or she thinks is going on in their unit and the ideas they are testing. This is followed by a “brain-storming” session with input coming from all specialties and excavators from other units. This is characteristic of a multi-disciplinary, integrated, team approach to archaeological fieldwork.

(photo Hilary Mcdonald)

(photo Hilary Mcdonald)

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Twentieth Year Celebration I: site tours

Posted on Mar 14, 2009

Mark Lehner and AERA team leaders gave donors, friends, and colleagues tours of the Giza dig site on Saturday, 14 March. 

Mark Lehner and donors listen while Ashraf Abd al Aziz explains work at the Chute.

Mark Lehner and donors listen while Ashraf Abd al Aziz explains work at the Chute.

This is a treat for non-specialists, as it the dig site is closed to the public and requires security clearance to access (thanks to Dr. Zahi Hawass). The guests were shown the Late Period burials, the Western Compound, the double-walled structure called the Chute, and the excavations at Khentkawes Town.

Joining Mark were Ann Lurie, a longtime and generous supporter, Bruce Ludwig, supporter and AERA board member, AERA co-founder, Matthew McCauley and his partner Jane Rusconi, and Suzanne, Nelson, and Nelson Del Rio Jr. Mohsen Kamel and Ana Tavares gave tours to colleagues.

Archaeologist, Freya Sadarangani explains her work in House 1, in Western Town. Archaeologist, Freya Sadarangani explains her work in House 1, in Western Town.

No matter how many times I watch and listen to this group of professionals, I’m always fascinated. I like patterns and archaeology is all about finding patterns from scattered evidence left behind in abandoned homes, buildings, hearths, workshops, and garbage dumps.

Just as an artist may see form differently than you and me in terms of light and shadow, details of a feature or a structure appear to the archaeologist’s eye in ways that we would usually miss.READ MORE »